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with president mohamed morsi. that is going to be a very interesting conversation, because, of course, as so many of you are aware, morsi is in a tough situation. many of the people in egypt, obviously, don't support working with israel at all. and within the past hour, there were several explosions in gaza city. let's get straight to our team there. >> obviously, looks like we're having a problem with that shot. we'll be getting there in just a moment. difficult to communicate with them, because of these rockets that have been going off. let's try again. let's go back there to ben. >> here in gaza. there were a few hours of relative quiet. but as we have seen within really the last 15 minutes, an intense attack on a building behind right where i am. it's a complex where we understand there are some government offices, and we understand from other palestinian sources that some of the security personnel who were vacated from other areas, other offices around gaza, may have been working out of that building. so certainly there was talk earlier this evening of the possibility of a cease-fire. hamas
grab by egypt's president. mohammed morsi is insisting he acted within the rights when he granted himself sweeping powers last week. correspondent steve harrigan has the latest from cairo. >> egypt president mohammed morsi is looking for a way out the fire storm he created thursday when he claimed the orders were not subject to review by egypt's court that move sparked four days of violent street in egypt. in the protest, 13 offices of the muslim brotherhood, morsi's chief supporters were ransacked or set on fire. morsi met today with senior judges from the judiciary council looking for a compromise to halt the violence. aides say morsi might be willing to limit the scope of his decree, but not withdraw it entirely. morsi supporters say the increased powers are only temporary, until a new constitution is completed. opponents say it's a power grab and part of an attempt to instill islamic law in egypt. >> we demand the president listen to people who chose it. people elected him so he would defend the people. not to do what he pleases. >> the administration was careful with the word
president mohammed morsi is meeting with the country's top judges to explain the extraordinary powers that he granted himself on thursday. among the decrees, judges cannot overturn any decision he makes or a law he imposes until a new constitution is finalized. mr. morsi extended the time to write the new constitution and he dismissed the country's attorney general. reza sayah is overlooking everything in tahrir square. most of us were thinking that mohammed morsi really very much the peacemaker, key to the cease-fire between israel and hamas. doesn't even settle with the truce and then morsi announces this decree essentially a huge power grab. what is the significance? >> reporter: well, suzanne, the significance is until a parliament is formed here in egypt, until a constitution is drafted, he is the most powerful man in egypt, and, technically, he can do whatever he wants without any apparent oversight. that's why he is being called egypt's new dictator. that's why you have thousands of protests taking place behind us in tahrir square. the protesters represent the opposing factions
. instead, the office of the e jimgs president, mohamed morsi, told cnn the egyptian government has no plans to make an announcement tonight. since wednesday of last week militants have fired hundreds of rockets into israel. we're about to bring you one family's harrowing story of dodging the rocket that hit their home today. random attacks like this provoke ferocious air assaults on gaza by the israelis, which also continued today. [ gunfire ] about two hours ago a reuters camera in gaza city caught this explosion. cnn's ben wedeman reports a building near the city was likely hit by an israeli air strike in gaza. he was on live with hala gorani when the explosion happened. take a look. >> i think it's pretty clear that we are moving in the direction of -- [ gunfire ] i can hear shattering glass out there right now. the building just shook of course because i was looking at the camera i didn't see where the blast took place. anybody see it? okay. to the north of this building here. so despite talk of cease fire, hala, it appears that the guns are still firing. >> the gaza ministry of health
's tahrir square and elsewhere in egypt today, sparked when president mohamed morsi granted himself broad new powers. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the widespread demonstrations, and assess what's behind the egyptian leader's moves. >> brown: then, the death toll in syria's 20-month war has climbed past 40,000, according to a human rights group. we get an update from margaret warner, reporting from the turkish border. >> suarez: we continue our conversations with newly-elected senators. judy woodruff talks with virginia democrat tim kaine. >> i intend to hit the ground on january 3 very much running. > running. we can make progress quickly if we listen to each other and find those points of common ground they think do exist. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> suarez: spencer michels has the story of a growing crackdown on dissidents and journalists in iran. >> brown: and we close with poet jennifer fitzgerald on hurricane sandy's destructive path through her home town of staten
it in the fascinating relationship between president obama and mohammed morsi. two mag ma tist pragmatists trya way to mediate this. you see it in the backdrop of surprising riots in jordan which will cause increasing problems, you have that changing environment which you know far more about. but the arab street needs something different. these governments now need to be more responsive to their people so that is an opening for a different relationship. and the president, no american president is going to criticize israel's launching of this war. but this is an opening for a relationship with egypt, with turkey, to implement a cease-fire that will monitor arms smuggling into gaza. that will monitor israel's relationship. overarching all of it, such a painful issue to discuss. overarching -- all of it is a history. going back at least to '67. of the united states' role, maybe, the united states' role as the enabler. as the political diplomatic economic military enabler of an israeli policy. in many ways, a younger generation is seeing israelis, that is not in the long-term benefit of the security of
think they're pretty close right now. i know that the egyptian president, mohamed morsi, very much involved. he's got good relations with hamas, israelis have a relationship, i don't know how good it is, but they have a relationship with the egyptians. there have been israeli envoys that have gone to cairo to meet with high-ranking egyptian officials. trying to broker a deal. no trust, hamas has to trust for the israelis and israelis have no trust for the hamas. there have been a lot of rockets and missiles coming from gaza into israeli and the israeli air strikes pounded away at targets in garz. a lot of casualties. there's no goodwill on the part of either of these, they don't trust each other. having said that, looks like they're close. hamas seems to think within the next hour or two some agreement will be announced, thanks to the egyptians. but i spoke with the israeli government spokesman for the israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu in the past hour, he said there's no deal yet. he didn't rule out there wouldn't be a deal but he said there's no deal yet. until all of the
egyptian president mohamed morsi as a dictator and accusing him of a power grab. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo. reza, what's it look like now? >> reporter: joe, it is 11:00 p.m. cairo time. these demonstrators started gathering around in tahrir square about 1:00 p.m. local time. that means they've been going strong for about ten hours. many thought maybe egyptians were worn out, tired of demonstrating after the 2011 revolution, but if you look at tahrir square today, if you look at cairo today, it doesn't seem like it. the demonstrations are continuing. so are clashes. about an hour and a half ago clashes taking place right where we are behind us at the hotel we're staying at. security forces clashing with protesters. a number of protesters ambushed a police vehicle carrying riot police. the police took off. the protesters got ahold of this truck, set it on fire. more security forces came in, shot tear gas and disbursed the protesters. we've seen similar clashes throughout the day. all the demonstrators angry after president morsi declared some controversial decrees that temporaril
, opponents set fire to the offices of president mohammed morsi's political party, the muslim brotherhood. there and elsewhere in egypt today, the president's critics and supporters clashed in the streets over his decree yesterday exempting himself from judicial review, and giving him authority to take steps against "threats to the revolution." morsi, egypt's first freely elected president, took office in june. in recent days, he'd garnered worldwide praise for mediating a cease-fire between israel and hamas. today, he told a supportive crowd outside the presidential palace in cairo that granting himself sweeping powers was necessary to prevent figures from the old regime from halting progress. >> ( translated ): i haven't taken a decision to use it against anyone-- to go against anyone is something that i could never be associated with-- or announcing that i am biased towards anyone. however, i must put myself on a clear path that will lead to the achievement of a clear goal. >> brown: the president's backers insisted the decree would be in effect only until a new constitution is approve
. in egypt, we've seen huge protests against president mohamed morsi and the new powers he assumed just a day after the truce. he's insisting he's committed to democracy, but opponents are calling him a dictator it could be a complication for the cease-fire between israel and hamas negotiations moving forward. let's go to cnn's reza sayah in cairo. >> reporter: joe, the coming weeks here in egypt are going to be fascinating when it comes to politics. that's because there is an intensifying faceoff between egyptian president mohamed morsi and his opponents. outrage aimed at mr. morsi after the announcement of a number of controversial decrees earlier this week that give him sweeping powers. they make him at least temporarily the most powerful man in egypt. also seems to be an effort to push through the all-important drafting of the new constitution and putting in place the formation of egypt's new parliament want. one of the decrees bans anyone, even the judiciary, from appealing, overturning, questioning any decision mr. morsi has made since taking office in june. that order is to be set in p
the president. mohamed morsi is accused of a massive power grab, slashing the authority of judges, barring courts from overturning his rulings. the secretary of state hillary clinton today told her egyptian counterpart that the united states does not want to see power concentrated in one set of hands. even as president morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has blasted his actions. let's go live to cnn's reza sayah in cairo watching what's going on. lots of people in tahrir square. we have live pictures of that as well. i understand that morsi actually met today with some of these top judges? >> reporter: he did, wolf. a lot of people eager to see how president morsi responds to this political crisis if he would back down under mounting pressure, if he'd make some concessions. it seems forn now the answer is no. many viewed one of his decrees as essentially disabling the judiciary by banning anyone -- any authority, even the judiciary, from questioning, appealing any decisions he made since june. the question was going into this meeting, would he scale back on some of those d
where mubarak stood. the question now is where does mohammed morsi stand, and how important of a role does he play in ending this before it gets too far? >> i think president morsi of egypt plays a critical role. he and his government are, as we speak, trying to broker a cease-fire. he is being aided and supported in these efforts by important arab players such as the prime minister of turkey, the crowned prince of qatar and cairo. even the tunisian prime minister that's visited gaza, and this is a muslim brotherhood president who has very close ties to hamas and, therefore, he is a valid interlocuture. >> i don't think they want to see a ground war or an extension of this conflict because it will destabilize an already destabilized region, especially considering what's happening in syria. >> ambassador let's talk about israeli politics as former ambassador to israel, you know the political system there well. we just finished our election. there's an election coming up in january. how much of this could possibly be the prime minister showing the strength of his administration as he st
today. martha: egyptian president mohammed morsi predicting and in the fighting between israel and gaza strip a perhaps within hours. you would not know it hearing the sirens blaring this hour. there is a scheduled arrival of secretary hillary clinton. this is now we start a brand-new "america's newsroom." i'm martha maccallum. bill: i'm bill hemmer. so far no evidence of that claim by president morsi. secretary clinton left a meeting with president obama. her first stop will be a meeting with prime minister benjamin netanyahu. martha: steven hayes, good morning to you, what do you expect to khreup hillary clinton's visit? >> i think it's an important visit. right now israel needs the united states to be a strong advocate and ally. if you look forward and look at the landscape that is facing israel, particularly over the next year, both in the short term fighting with hamas and then in the long term when you look at potential unrest in syria, in iran, in the region generally, i think this. during this fight the united states needs to signal that we are going to be with israel and going
us live now. good morning to you. >> good morning, lynn. it's a critical day for mohamed morsi, a former leader of the muslim brotherhood which began on thursday when he issued the decree putting all his decisions effectively above the law. he said he was doing that to protect egypt's very slow move towards democracy from the judges and prosecutors mostly hand picked by hosni mubarak who were seen as sabotaging the process. the backlash was huge, was immediate, the past four days with national strikes, a sit-in on tahrir square and on going clashes between pro morsi and anti--morsi camps and the riot police. so far neither side has backed down. the pressures are growing. egypt's stock market, after losing $5 billion yesterday, has dropped another 5% today. all eyes now are on this meeting between top judges and morsi who it's hoped we'll find some kind of face-saving end to a crisis splitting egypt apart just when it should be sitting down, unified, and working on things like a new constitution. lynn, if there's any reminder of how all this might play out, there's a funeral lat
with this muslim brotherhood path mohamed morsi. what are the charges he's interested in compromise? >> reporter: he has shown no signs of making a concession. the opposition says they will stay put in tahrir square. they say they won't negotiate until the president makes a complete stepdown. what we could see are parts of the government simply refusing to work. that's what we saw today with two courts. the judges saying we are not going to work until the president backs down. martha: steve harrigan, thank you very much. bill: who exactly is president morsi. he's 61 years old, born in egypt. but educated in the united states. got a ph.d in engineering from the university of southern california in 1982. he also worked for nasa developing engines for the space shuttle program. martha: interesting. president morsi is the leader of the muslim brotherhood he was narrowly elected in june of this year. he became a member of the muslim brotherhood when the organization was banned. one of his goals is to create a state ruled by islamic or sharia laws. the u.s. does not consider the muslim brotherhood a f
-fire, the u.s. is trying to use every diplomatic contact it has from mohamed morsi, the president of egypt, to the prime minister of turkey, prime minister erdogan to get the cease-fire. i think that the interesting question, the one that really -- the administration would love to focus on in the next few weeks is how do you get to a more stable situation in gaza where israel doesn't have to periodically take out heavy weapons and threaten the ground assault. we don't know yet whether that will happen. and people are talking about lots of possibilities. again, the central change that would be most beneficial would be if the new egyptian government decided to really get involved and in effect take ownership of the problems in gaza as the closest backer, supporter, of hamas. and if that happened, you'd have a quite different situation and one that potentially would be a lot better for israel. >> rose: and where are the -- where are the turks and where are the emir of qatar on this issue? >> i think both the turks and the qatarrys are supportive in general but the people with real leverage ar
president mohammed morsi in a few light. no matter how the truce plays out, his reputation has been enhanced. paula newton looks at the winners and losers in this conflict. >> reporter: however crude the calculation, especially amid the civilian casualties, there are winners and losers in this truce, and they are already reshaping political alliances in the region. we begin in egypt and president mohammed morsi clearly underestimated his handling of what a mine field of competing interests has given him much needed political capital in both the arab world and the united states. >> puts a civilian president in egypt perceived as a weak leader has much, to everyone's surprise, delivered. >> reporter: then there's israel and its tenacious prime minister benjamin netanyahu. after israel targeted and killed hamas's military leader, he launched air strikes hitting more than 1,500 targets in gaza, dismantling some of hamas's arsenal of weapons. israel had a successful combat debut of iron dome. u.s.-funded defense shield that kept dozens of rockets from hitting israeli civilians. the counter point
to the government in egypt, the president mohamed morsi, that they would stop firing into israel. if that were to be revoked, that would be a violation. they would be breaking their word to the egyptians and that would cause some serious repercussions i assume, christiane, between the egypt government, muslim brotherhood-led government, and hamas. >> reporter: well, i was obviously talking about what's the perspective from this side was. but of course israel's demand was that there would be no more rockets and no more of that fire going into israel. that was something they really wanted. and of course israel does not want to see hamas resupplied through the tunnel network. that is still to be worked out. i asked him whether or not he got weapons and whether hamas was getting weapons from iran, and he gave me a non-confirmation confirmation. it's an open secret that they come through those tunnels. so that has to be taken in hand. we're not sure how that's going to happen, but obviously there is some egyptian role in that as well. but, yes, egypt is the guarantor of this cease-fire. neither sid
to president mohamed morsi is growing. for a third straight day, protesters hit the streets demanding he rescind a decree that gives him unlimited power. we get more now from cairo. >> reporter: outrage, clashes, and anguish in tahrir. thousands of angry egyptians back in a public square that has become the arab world's emblem for the democratic right to protest. this was where egyptians demanded the ouster of former president hosni mubarak last year. this time, the fury aimed at current president mohamed morsi. >> we're here because we don't want him to rule us anymore. >> it's a one-man show. he wants to do everything. this is nothing at all what we want. >> reporter: on thursday, the new islamist president made himself the most powerful man in egypt by announcing sweeping decrees he says are designed to push forward the drafting of egypt's new constitution and speed up the formation of a government that still is missing a parliament. >> whether it causes anyone to overturn any of the declarations. that's the same place the parliament is born. technically, it means for now he can do wh
's president, mohamed morsi is saying that israel's aggression, as he calls it, against gaza will end in a few hours. our reza sayeh is there. we'll get an update from him this breaking story. we're right on the other side of this break with his report. >>> welcome back. breaking news to get to. we were hearing and we are waiting for a report from reza sayeh, what egypt's president mohamed morsi is now saying. he is saying that id real's aggression, as he calls it, against gaza will end some time today, maybe in a few hours and that egyptian-mediated efforts will produce positive results. reza sayeh is reporting for us on this issue. he joins us live. so, back up and give us some detail. is mohamed morsi really the person who would be able to effectively say that this aggression now ends? >> reporter: well, it's tough to say. what we do know is that it's intelligence officials in egypt that are apparently leading the negotiations and the man who is doing it is mohammed mashat. in 2011 he helped to negotiate the release of israeli soldier, which suggests this egyptian spy chief has pretty stron
to hear, egypt's president mohamed morsi suggesting progress in attempts at brokering a cease-fire. and backing hamas, released a statement saying, the travesty of the israel aggression on gaza will end in a few hours. we're going to get to the details of all of this and the apparent pause in fighting in just a moment. but first, we want to look at the united states role and all the various players that are involved in this. and in about an hour, secretary of state hillary clinton is to meet with israel prime minister benjamin netanyahu. tomorrow, she is scheduled to meet with the palestinian authority. mahmoud abbas. he's in the west bank. that's on the opposite side of israel from gaza. he's going to be talking -- talking to the palestinian authority, it is a way really to communicate with hamas. now, clinton cannot speak with hamas directly because the united states considers it a terrorist group. so by talking to palestinians she can reach hamas. talking to egypt's president is going to be her last stop. as we see here. so by talking to egypt, that's another way for her to
in for jon scott. with egypt's president mohammed morsi, it is a big test for the new leader. steve harrigan is live in cairo. some are saying that mohammed morsi is the real winner here. you have all sides facing the same person. americans giving him high marks for his mediation, even some israeli officials praising the president. as far as the mediation goes, there were some concerns about which direction he would say, a long-term member of the muslim brotherhood and a public sympathizer of hamas. and in the end, he worked closely with u.s. officials about that days of violence. he had all those conversations with president obama. >> we are wondering. he is trying to change the constitution and give themselves more power. what can you tell us about that? >> some dramatic developments which have just occurred in the last hours, and we have had four days of protests. they could be extremely large tomorrow. what the egyptian president has done is basically said that no one can overrule any of his decrees since he became president in june. not even the courts. he also said any of those guilty
're with us. i'm jenna lee. jon:. i'm jon scott. the first elected leader, president mohammed morsi expected to come face-to-face with senior judges in egypt who say his power grab has gone too far. there are indications that the both side are trying to find some middle ground. morsi's maneuver unleased a rage of protests that continues to rage across the country. meanwhile the u.s. embassy in cairo says there are sporadic clashes between protesters and police near its entrance. we're told some rocks landed inside the walls of that huge compound. embassy officials say there is no indication they are the target. egypt wields enormous influence in the middle east peac process. that power demonstrated by brokering the cease-fire between is rainfall and hamas. steve care began streaming live too cairo with the latest developments right now. steve? >> reporter: jon, this is a key meeting between egypt's president and the chief justices in cairo. already there are hints from the president's side that compromise may be in the offing. perhaps a scaling down of that presidential decree which basicall
power. mohamed morsi decreed that all his decisions are final and not subject to appeal or review. he also ordered the retrial of former president hosni mubarak for the killing of protesters during the revolution. some egyptians protested morsi's action today, accusing him and the muslim brotherhood of seizing too much power. president obama spent the holiday at the white house. he phoned 10 american service men and women in afghanistan to thank them for their sacrifice. at a u.s. base in kabul, troops feasted on 200 turkeys and the trimmings. about 66,000 americans are still deployed in afghanistan. most are expected home by the end of 2014. as we reported here last night, america's ambassador to the united nations, susan rice, has broken her silence about the controversial remarks she made back in september about the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. ambassador chris stevens and three other americans were killed in that attack. sharyl attkisson in washington has more on that tonight. sharyl. >> reporter: ambassador rice defended her comment from more than nine weeks a
with their new president, mohamed morsi who said last week that his decisions cannot be challenged by the courts which gives him almost absolute power. and our holly williams is above tahrir square in cairo this evening. holly, what's going on in the crowd behind you now? >> reporter: scott, we are seeing scenes reminisce september of the egyptian revolution. tahrir square was once again carpeted in people today, tens of thousands of people who poured in from every direction and they were chanting the same slogan that they chanted during the revolution. the people want the downfall of the regime. i was out on this square earlier today talking to people. some people are saying that they won't leave the streets until president morsi rescinds the decrees that have given him sweeping new powers. we've seen very low-level violence here in cairo, but in several other cities there have been violent confrontations between president morsi's supporters and his opponents. >> pelley: is there any indication that all of this public demonstration is moving morsi to rescind his decree? >> reporter: well, if pr
is not the old dictatorship but the country's first elected president, mohamed morsi who they accuse of overreaching himself before i assuming sweeping new powers. >> egypt and the u.s. have a very important relationship. what side is the obama administration taking in this crisis? >> reporter: well, u.s. criticism so far has been extremely muted. some people here in egypt are disappointed by that. the u.s. government is really in a tricky situation because it's relying on president morsi to help with peace efforts in the israeli-palestinian conflict. last week he helped broker a truce between hamas and israel. so we're back in the same situation we had under the old dictatorship which is that the u.s. can't be to overtly critical because it relies on egypt's help here in the middle east. >> holly williams in cairo for us this morning. thank you so much. let's take a quick break. when we come back the latest on the civil war in syria including a report from one city at the center of the conflict. later, would be millionaires line up for a chance at tonight's historic powerball lotter
-fire's holding so far. >> and you thank egypt's president mohamed morsi for that? >> he is so far now proving to be a constructive partner certainly as proven in this last operation. >> is he honoring the peace treaty with israel? >> i think there's peace between egypt and israel on a daily basis, yes. >> what about syria? what would you like to see the government of israel as far as syria is concerned? because it's intense what's going on right now. about 40,000 people have been killed over the past year and a half. >> it's horrible. it's a terrible tragedy. we, the people of israel, look at the people of syria with great respect, even awe standing up and risking and even giving their lives for freedom from the terrible bashar al assad regime. we want them to go. we've long wanted him to depart. he is an ally of iran. he has not only killed 40,000 of his own people, he's tried to make a secret nuclear military program, he's helped in providing tens and tens of thousands of missiles to terrorists in lebanon and gaza. he is a loose cannon. we want him gone. we want to see a democratic and peac
in several cities. >> we support mohamed morsi's correct decision and eventually the good from the bad will be distinguishable. we support dr. morsi. >> u.s. officials raised concerns about morsi's decree. today the state department's victoria newlyand called for calm. >> what is important to us is that these issues be slelgted through dialogues, that these issues be selgtzed democraticry. we are encouraged that the various important stakeholders in egypt are now talking to each other, that president morsi is consulting on the way forward but we're not going to prejudge where that will go. >> the domestic unrest has more than shadowed morsi's role in the cease-fire between israel and hamas. concern was growing about more trouble in cairo tomorrow. this afternoon, the muzz lum brotherhood spokesman said the party had postponed demonstrations tuesday to avoid bloodshed. >> brown: a short while ago i spoke with nancy youssef. nan nancy youssef, let's begin with the latest statements from president morsi's spokesman. it's hard to know whether the president is backing off or simply clarify
, the principles of the 2011 revolution is in jeopardy, and they believe its current president mohammed morsi who has put those principles in jeopardy. all this outrage and fury as the outcome of a set of decrees suddenly announced on thursday night. these give them sweeping powers and it seems to be an effort to push through the drafting of egypt's all new constitution. one of the decrees says that no one, not even the judiciary can overturn and appeal any of mr. morsi's declarations, decisions since he took office in june. this order seems to be put in place until a parliament is in place. several months from now. technically this is a man who can do whatever he wants for the next few months without any oversight. that's one of the decrees, fredricka, that people here are outraged about. they're describe this as a power grab by mr. morsi. does it seem that most people understand that and does it make a difference at all? >> reporter: no. they reject that position by mr. morsi, and that explains the outrage. dramatic scenes in tahrirr square, including alexandria and port sayid. these are remini
nearby israeli cities with mostly ineffectually are homemade. >> jennifer: okay. so mohammed morsi the egyptian president has emerged as you have identified, as we have, too, as the central figure in these talks. do you think that role, that elevation diminishes the u.s.'s role in middle east peace negotiations? and is that a good thing? >> well, i don't think it diminishes the u.s. role because egypt under morsi and israel under netanyahu are really far apart. so they do need a mediator. the united states is viewed in the region as not a reliable mediator. as being way too pro israeli but to the extent that the united states can lubricate things and i mean hillary clinton now is acting as an intermediary between israel and egypt and carrying messages back and forth the way kissinger used to carry messages back and forth between sidot and baggen. the u.s. has a prominent role. the terms on which this crisis might end are ones that will be negotiated between egypt and israel. i think what israel wants is simila
mohammed morsi will try to explain reasons for giving himself nearly absolute power. he and his backer notice muslim brotherhood argued he needed to do it to speed along the transition to a new government. the move has sparked new rallies which have turned violent at times. [chanting] >> shepard: meantime judges on egypt's highest court who lost their power under this decree today went on strike and say they will not return to work until the president gives up the sweeping powers that he somehow granted himself. palestinian leaders predict they are going to score historic win tomorrow when the united nations votes on whether to recognize a palestinian state. analysts expect the vote to pass and by a big majority it would grant palestine only limited understood -- statehood. against the effort it could give palestinians new leverage against israel. mahmoud abbas has said he will not negotiate with israel as long as it keeps expanding settlements in the west bank. and the israeli prime minister has refused to freeze that construction. "the fox report's" correspondent jonathan hunt is at
passage of a new constitution. all across egypt this evening, people watched as president mohamed morsi spoke to state television interviewers addressed the nation. he defended his decision to grant himself powers free from judicial review. >> ( translated ): my responsibility is to protect this nation from any conspiracy or from any attempt to go backwards. as the country's president my responsibility, is to achieve justice and respect the laws and to lay down many rules in the absence of parliament until they convene and are able to vote on behalf of the people. >> brown: the islamist president also criticized the outpouring of protests against his actions. on tuesday, at least 200,000 people filled cairo's tahrir square, accusing morsi and his muslim brotherhood of hijacking last year's revolution. liberal and secular groups also condemned a move to fast-track a final vote on a new constitution. >> ( translated ): we want a constitution that represents all egyptian people, not one that represent a certain faction of egyptians. >> ( translated ): the constitutional panel tasked to >>
throughout the week about what the new president, mohammed morsi has done, a member of the islamic brotherhood, is egypt the next iran that the united states now has to fear? melissa: well it could be. morsi frankly is consolidating power and he is squeezing out the minority, and the minorities are the christians, the liberals and secularists many of whom are in the square right now. the constituent assembly writing this constitution you referred to earlier, the liberals and the secularists and christians have long left to participate in that because they were being frozen out of the process. so it's, it is questionable the value of this document and whether it will accommodate some of the rights and social and political justices that the people in that square are wanting. bill: many people consider morsi to be moving along that line. i mean do you see it yourself? or do you see him holding back from that? melissa: well i think he is probably going to pull back a little bit. i would like to belief the administration and state department is working certainly, you know, off the media
. >>> in the streets of egypt today, scenes just like this one. two sides clashing over president mohamed morsi's decision to grant himself sweeping new powers. the violent protests played out behind closed doors, morsi met with egypt's top judges to explain his move. these are the same judges who are now banned from overturning any decision he makes until a new constitution is finalized. >>> israel, a country in the midst of very fragile cease-fire with hamas, and now also its own political upheaval, long time israeli defense minister ehud barak making the surprise announcement he's quitting. he says he wants to spend more time with his family and make room for new political figures. here he was. >> translator: i feel it is important that other people should take leading positions in israel. change is in the positions of power is a good thing. there are many ways to contribute to society and the country. and not necessarily through politics. >> barak says he will see out his term, staying on as defense minister until a new cabinet is formed next january. barak played a cruel role as a key oppo
-democracy activist mohammed el baradi calling on morsi to rescind his decrees. it's not clear how many judges are going to heed the call for a strike because remember a lot of judges in egypt support mr. morsi and the muslim brotherhood and so do a lot of egyptians. supporters of muslim brotherhood have called for demonstrations throughout the next few days, and that's why there's a lot of drama that comes with these developments. you have mr. morsi seemingly entrenched in power. the muslim brotherhood movement taking on opposing factions who are mobilizing, demanding for him to rescind his decrees. rez sesay a -- reza sayah, cair. >>> we have learned a delegation from gaza is now in cairo. the three sides will get back to hammering out the cease-fire. adding his voice to the discussion, the leader of hezbollah in lebanon. he sent a stern warning today to israel threatening major retaliation if israel makes a move on lebanon. hezbollah is not involved in the renewed hostilities but they have fought with israel in the past. tensions their shared border really has never gone away. >>> at least
in the days ahead. president obama also spoke last night with egypt president mohamed morsi about working together to preserve peace and security in the region. tension between israel and egypt's new islamist government has increased since the attacks with egypt recalling its ambassador to israel in protest. richard haass, also an emergency meeting of the u.n. security council last night. sift through this for us. how big is this? how significant is this in the middle east right now? >> well, it's big for lots of reasons, because it's not happening in isolation. one is you have the largest military clashes between israel and hamas in, what, four year now, and it's not going to stop. at times it doesn't matter in the middle east exactly why things begin. over the last few months there have been hundreds of rocket attacks, now this, then retaliation. it just happens. second of all, it's happening in the absence of anything political. there's no dialogue going on whatsoever between israelis and palestinians. this can't substitute for this. thirdly, egyptians withdrew their ambassador. since
, egypt's president mohamed morsi has met with both the head of hamas's political office and head of islamic jihad, the two biggest factions in gaza. both of them are saying that they're willing to enter truce with israel on certain conditions. these conditions are that gaza lifts a punishing blockade and siege that has been imposed on gaza since 2006 and allows the free moment movement of people in and out of the territory and supplies and medicine. they want assurances from israel that israel does not carry out any more assassinations on top palestinian leaders like the one we saw last wednesday that triggered all of this. at the same time, they want guarantees from the international community that israel will abide by these commitments. for its part israel says that the only condition it would accept is a complete cessation of rocket fire into southern israel and wants egypt to guarantee no more weapons will be smuggled into the gaza strip. both sides say they want to avert a war but really right now, they have demands and egyptian officials are hinting they have narrowed the g
's president mohammed morsi tomorrow. later this week he will travel to israel to meet with prime minister netanyahu and also to the west bank to meet the palestinian president mahmoud abbas. the trouble with these negotiations as so often in these cases is who stops firing first. in the word of u.s. officials that is clearly up to hamas to do. listen. >> we have been very clear that israel has a right of self-defense. we have been very clear that rockets continue to be fired and land on israel. we have been very clear that we are working to try to get this conflict deescalated. we have been very clear about our concern for civilians and innocence on both sides. >> important to note that while diplomacy has not yet succeeded, neither, shep, has it failed. shep? >> shepard: jonathan hunt at the united nations for us. well, it was a huge day on wall street. as stocks soared to the best trading session since the presidential election since nearly two weeks ago. if you have been afraid to peek at your 401(k) it might not be a bad idea now. the dow up 207 points. nasdaq up 63. s&p up to 27. app
. it's being mediated by the egyptians by mohammed morsi and members of his cabinet. it's the first time he's had to negotiate something on this scale since winning the presidency in june. there's an israeli delegation here as well. the negotiations have been happening for a few days now. today we're hearing from people privately that there doesn't seem to be a particular sticking point but that both sides are... that's really being lost is the time that's having to happen between shuttling between two sides that won't face each other in the same room. remember though it's in everybody's interest to keep promising that this cease-fire agreement will come soon because of potential instability. if there isn't a promise of some sort of settlement to this, i think there's universal agreement that the worst case scenario is escalation. >> woodruff: nancy, what are the israelis asking for? >> i think very simply they're asking for hamas to stop launching rockets towards them. remember, this time it was significant in that a rocket reached the city of tel aviv which is a first. and so i th
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